2011 Arthur C. Clarke Awards Honor Elon Musk and Freeman Dyson

Washington, D.C.: Tuesday, April 5, 2011 – The Washington D.C.-based Arthur C. Clarke Foundation today honored the 2011 winners of the Arthur C. Clarke Lifetime Achievement and Innovator awards.
The Arthur C. Clarke Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes “an individual, a group or an entity that exemplifies the values and accomplishments of Sir Arthur’s life. The award honors substantial and enduring contributions that relate the sciences and arts in meeting the challenges of contemporary life and the needs of tomorrow.”

The 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award winner is renown physicist and astronomer Dr. Freeman Dyson, selected by the Foundation for his exceptional career across multiple disciplines, including quantum electrodynamics, invention of the Dyson series, his work more than half a century ago in the use of nuclear power for space flight, design work on the TRIGA, a small, inherently safe nuclear reactor used throughout the world in hospitals and universities for the production of isotopes, and other initiatives.

In the late 1970s, Dyson worked with the Institute for Energy Analysis that pioneered multidisciplinary climate studies. He has also performed climate studies for the JASON defense advisory group with which he continues a long term relationship.

In 1998, Dyson joined the board of the Solar Electric Light Fund. Since 2003, Dyson has served as president of the Space Studies Institute.

This year’s Innovator’s Award winner is Elon Musk, selected by the Foundation for his ambitious career-long pursuit of three “important problems” near and dear to the heart of Sir Arthur Clarke – the Internet, clean energy, and space.

In 1995, Musk founded Zip2, which provided online content publishing software for news organizations. He sold that firm four years later. Musk then co-founded X.com, an online financial services and e-mail payment company.

In 2002, Musk founded his third company, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), where he currently serves as both CEO and CTO. Musk views space exploration as a critical step in expanding, if not preserving, the consciousness of human life. Musk’s goal is to reduce significantly the cost of human spaceflight.

Musk is also a co-founder, chairman of the board, and sole product architect at Tesla Motors, and is chairman of the board of SolarCity, a photovoltaic products and services startup. His motivation for funding both SolarCity and Tesla is to help combat global warming.

“This year’s Arthur C. Clarke Award winners exemplify the scope and vastness of Sir Arthur’s limitless imagination and understanding,” Foundation chairman Tedson J. Meyers said. “Freeman Dyson, like Sir Arthur a World War II veteran of the RAF, has spent a lifetime pursuing scientific excellence, always with a mind toward the larger social and ethical ramifications of his work and his successes.

“Likewise, in Elon Musk, we have a man who has dedicated his career and his efforts to developing solutions to problems that affect all humankind – access to space, communications, energy, and the environment. We are delighted that both have accepted the 2011 Arthur C. Clarke Awards.”

Past Clarke Lifetime Achievement winners are Eutelsat chairman Giuliano Berretta, inventor and futurist Raymond Kurzweil, CBS Evening News anchorman Walter Cronkite, science fiction writer Ben Bova, former Matra Marconi Space board chairman Claude Goumy, retired Space Systems Loral chairman Robert Berry and the first Intelsat director general, Santiago Astrain.

Past Clarke Innovator winners include NASA scientist and program leader S. Pete Worden, Cornell University professor and Mars Rover program team leader Steven Squyres, Bigelow Aerospace’s Robert Bigelow, Dr. Brad Edwards, and D.K. Sachdev and Dr. S. Joseph Campanella.

The 2011 Arthur C. Clarke Awards were presented before an invited audience at Intelsat headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, April 5, 2011.

For information, contact Foundation Secretary Scott Chase at scottchase@verizon.net or 301-879-1613.

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